Litigation, arbitration and dispute resolution

Chevalier & Sciales specialises in financial litigation, often involving high-stakes and complex and issues relating to corporate, commercial, banking and financial law and encompassing both jurisdictional and arbitration issues, and involving amounts ranging up to one billion euros.

Our range of services includes:

Corporate litigation

  • Directors’ liability
  • Group liability
  • Shareholder’s disputes
  • Provisional and protective measures

Investment fund-related litigation

  • Prospectus liability.
  • Limited partner and general partner disputes, disputes among fund principals and conflicts of interests.
  • Assisting clients with cases involving investments in relation to the Bernard Madoff case.

Private banking litigation

  • Representing investors in issues arising out of bank-customer relationships.
  • Litigation over compensation for substantial market losses.

Arbitration

  • Assisting clients with the enforcement of arbitration awards.
  • Representation of a client in an ongoing bilateral investment treaty arbitration case involving more than $1billion.

More information can be found in our brochure (available here).

Highlighted deals

arrow_forward  Enforcement of a commercial arbitration award before the Luxembourg Supreme Court in which an EU member state was ordered to pay an indemnity exceeding €500 million.

arrow_forward Appointment as counsel in an ongoing bilateral investment treaty arbitration case between our client and an EU member state involving more than $1billion.

arrow_forward  Appointment as counsel before the European Court of Human Rights in proceedings against an EU member state.

arrow_forward  Representation of institutional, hedge fund and high net worth investors in Madoff-related fraud litigation.

arrow_forward  Litigation regarding compensation for substantial financial market losses, principally resulting from investment in uncovered options and extensive use of Lombard credits.

arrow_forward Litigation relating to errors committed in the performance of a discretionary investment management mandate.